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Your Attitude Towards Your Software Licence Reflects The Ethos Of Your Organisation

We all know the main risks associated with neglecting software licence regulations: you won’t be able to get technical support when things go wrong, your software won’t be up-to-date blah blah blah. 

A risk commonly overlooked when it comes to the neglect of software licence is the impact it can have on the attitude of staff at the organisation. When software licence regulations are broken, then so is the law. Let’s think about the impact this has on the staff at an organisation.

Build Trust

The ideal relationship most bosses have with their staff is based on a bond of trust. You want to be able to trust your staff to get on with their work, without having to keep a careful eye over them.

This trust will be established by the ideology and ethos of the organisation. The relationship should be symbiotic.  Staff have a dishonest attitude bred into them when the company they work for engages in dishonest practices.

Lying, cheating and backstabbing are rife at dishonest organisations. Eventually, this attitude will be turned on the company itself.

If you want to encourage a dishonest mentality in your staff, then software piracy is a great way to do it. When staff see the organisation is doing all it can to abide by the law, then their work will gleam with integrity.

Misconceptions

It is agreed that businesses need to be educated in how they use their software. Many people think when they purchase software that they then own it; in fact, they are actually only purchasing a licence to use the software. 

This has come through a lack of education in businesses over how software can be used. As the enforcement of software licence law becomes more stringent, organisations are realising it is up to them to ensure they comply. 

The maintenance of an honest ethos is imperative if any business is to develop to its full capacity. If it transpires your company has been using software illegally, then it can be a public relations nightmare.